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Here's a list of three things that you are unlikely to do, at least in this order:

1.       Watch a Swedish movie called The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
2.       Read about the Swedish sex charges against Julian Assange
3.       Book a vacation to Sweden

I am always amused by the strange impact of unintended consequences. Julian Assange simply wanted to release some embarrassing information, have hot sex with a Swedish babe then have hot sex with an acquaintance of that same babe one day later. That's just one example of why the Swedish language has 400 words that all mean "and your cute friend is next."

But things didn't turn out as Assange hoped.  The unintended consequence of his actions is that he managed to make Sweden look like a country that's governed by congenital idiots and populated with nothing but crazy sluts and lawyers. And don't get me started about the quality of their condoms.

To be fair, I don't know if Assange's alleged broken condom is because the product was defective. We have good evidence that Assange has the world's biggest set of nuts, so assuming some degree of proportionality, he'd put a strain on any brand of condom that didn't have rebar ribs.

Assange had a lot of help making Sweden look like the last place on Earth that you would want to take your penis. The aforementioned megahit movie, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, makes the place look like a snow-filled ass cave that Jeffrey Dahmer lived in before he got a raise. (It's a good movie otherwise.)

If you haven't read any background about the so-called rape charges against Assange, you really should. Apparently Swedish laws are unique.  If you have a penis, you're half a rapist before you even get through customs. And if your condom breaks, that's jail time. What I'm saying is that the Club Med in Sweden is a nervous place.

I was having a hard time making up my mind about Assange. On one hand, he might be hurting the interests of my country and putting people in danger. Death to him! On the other hand, a little extra government transparency might prevent more problems than it causes.  Hero!  It was a toss-up. Then Sweden turned Assange from a man-whore publicity hound into Gandhi.  Advantage: Assange.

The one thing I know for sure is that I'm a fan of the hackers who are dispensing vigilante justice. Here's another unintended consequence: The hackers could end up organizing over this issue and ultimately forming a shadow government of their own, if they haven't already.  I welcome my hacker overlords.

Prediction: The governments of the world can't let Assange become a martyr. He would be too powerful. They'll pressure Sweden to release him on some sort of technicality.

 

 

 
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Dec 20, 2010
Probably someone already pointed this out but what you said about rape charges in Sweden is not true. The crime was not that the condom broke but that when it did she asked him to stop and he did not stop.
 
 
0 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 20, 2010
I'm sorry to take some space from all the spam from this weekend, but just wanted to mention this take on the story (from John C. Dvorak)

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2373977,00.asp
 
 
Dec 13, 2010
I've done all three; just not in that order.
 
 
Dec 13, 2010
I'm with 'ya re: Assange's major Cojones, and anything that keeps Power from getting too smug and comfortable is always to the good. And we need to hear about things like the massive number of civilians being killed by coalition troops in Iran & Afghanistan.
Although I think he also kinda "jumped the shark" a bit when they started releasing the embarrassing "diplomatic memos". OK, so it shows that even as a "diplomat", Hillary Clinton can be a b*tch... BFD, what else is new?!
But probably the biggest thing to come out of all this is the sudden popularity (and ease) of coordinated "denial of service" attacks (just make sure to "proxify" your IP address first)!
 
 
+2 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 13, 2010
Scott, your hacker overlords have already sold your blog to spammers.

Sorry, dude.
 
 
0 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 12, 2010
This place is completely overrun with spam. I am outta here! Good luck to you all.
 
 
-13 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 12, 2010
Assange needs a real ass-whipping. Where are our peaceful Muslim friends with their little fatwahs when you need them?

Cut off his head! Send his mother his penis! The little creep deserves no better.

There is no honor in any kind of stealing, and there is no honor in handling stolen goods no matter the nature.

Forget the ass-whipping. Hang the little wimp.
 
 
+2 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 11, 2010
@Me3

Is resisting government action bad if it endangers somebody, even if the government action is bad? Yeah, you could argue that such leaks put some people in danger, but the actions of the US government itself puts lots of people in danger every day. I'm not saying that I completely agree with putting anybody in danger, or with wikileaks, but I can't believe that we should put people in prison for talking, even if it puts people's lives in danger.
 
 
-6 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 11, 2010
PUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDIPUDDI SOME PEOPLE JUST WANT TO WATCH THE WORLD PUDDI
 
 
Dec 11, 2010
Here's some fisking of the reporting on the rape charges:
http://jezebel.com/5711600/how-aol-news-started-the-sex-by-surprise-lie

There's been a lot of minimizing and misinterpretation. The Swedish laws are neither unreasonable nor cute.
 
 
0 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 10, 2010
@k:

Okay, I think I found what you are talking about. Take a look at this:

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/11/pentagon-boss-is-not-sweating-wikileaks/

Gates said that the *leaked diplomatic cables* were not a big deal to the Pentagon. He in no way said that the earlier release of leaked names of Afghans that helped coalition forces, or the leaking of the methods used to hunt down the Taliban were not a problem.
 
 
-1 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 10, 2010
@l16 -- You said:
---
"i'm not trying to be flippant but you have just stated that what 'we' are currently doing about IEDs is not working, so why continue with a flawed tactic? what was it einstein said about insanity... "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results". your argument just got bushed."
---
Sorry, but your arugment is simplistic and wrong. It is an 'all or nothing' fallacy. Because some troops are being killed by IEDs, you say all our tactics are 'flawed', and therefore trying to stop IED attacks is apparently pointless in your view. But in the real world, casualties are a fact of war. Our forces do everything possible to minimize them, and have done just that. The vast majority of IEDs are discovered and disarmed. Again, one of the primary reasons for that was tips from Afghans. Now, the number of IEDs discovered and defused harrmlessly will go way down, and casualties will go way up. That blood will be on Assange's hands.

===============================================

@k -- You said:
---
"@me3: Despite all the uproar back in the summer at the time of the release of the Afghanistan and Iraq data, claiming that it put the folks who helped us in great danger, that was not true. Later, around October, if I remember correctly, the Pentagon, after studying the released material carefully, quietly announced that all the sensitive details had been properly scrubbed from the data by Wikileaks before they released the data. The data release put our local helpers in no more danger than they already are."
---
I do not remember any such statement by the Pentagon, and I have been following this quite closely. I am pressed for time at the moment, but I will look around later and see what I can find.
 
 
Dec 10, 2010
Less a toss-up than a toss-off (English joke)
 
 
Dec 10, 2010
@me3: Despite all the uproar back in the summer at the time of the release of the Afghanistan and Iraq data, claiming that it put the folks who helped us in great danger, that was not true. Later, around October, if I remember correctly, the Pentagon, after studying the released material carefully, quietly announced that all the sensitive details had been properly scrubbed from the data by Wikileaks before they released the data. The data release put our local helpers in no more danger than they already are.

Did you miss that admission by the Pentagon? It would not be surprising had you missed it, since the announcement was made rather quietly. Governments, like people, don't like to admit when they have been wrong, especially when they have been publicly and very loudly wrong.

Wikileaks seems to be taking the same approach to scrubbing the data in the diplomatic cables release. They did not dump the raw data onto the Internet. They gave the raw data to three or four respected newspapers, and, in cooperation with those newspapers, are scrubbing the cables and releasing them slowly, as the scrubbing is completed. Certainly some top government officials have been named in the cables, but I don't believe you can consider embarrassing top government officials to be in the same category as disclosing the identity of everyday people who cooperated with our forces in Afghanistan and Iraq. The latter deserve, and are getting, protection from disclosure. The former do not.
 
 
+2 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 10, 2010
Thanks for speaking out, Scott. I'm starting to feel like I am living in a bad movie.
 
 
Dec 10, 2010
>Hackers hacked and supported Wikileaks/Assange

What Hackers? they are punk kids using a freeware on the internet to attack site. It takes ABSOLUTELY no brains. You Scott, can do it with 3 mins of tutoring. Google for LOIC.
 
 
+2 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 10, 2010
@me3-you say "By outing Afghans that were helping us, he insured that no Afghan in his right mind will help us again. Our primary source of intel on where IEDs are being planted was tips from Afghan civilians. No more. IEDs are the biggest cause of severe injury and death to coalition troops, including Australian ones."

i'm not trying to be flippant but you have just stated that what 'we' are currently doing about IEDs is not working, so why continue with a flawed tactic?

what was it einstein said about insanity... "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results".

your argument just got bushed.
 
 
-1 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 10, 2010
@me3 As I pointed out Assange's Action Theater is here to make us think. And your point about the difficulty this could lead to war/peace operations in the middle east is well taken. But add to that the following: how come so many secrets are so easy to purloin from the US Army? Should that not also be a cause for concern? That is where I think we need to create a much less centralised society, where each of us learns to control and own our data/beliefs. A peer to peer citizen army (as the Swiss have) where each one learns the security of their devices. We also need to be able to encrypt our communications, which currently is flowing completely in the open on the internet... That is what I argue with I hope a touch of humour at http://tinyurl.com/stripleak
 
 
Dec 9, 2010
"Eating in Sweden is really just a series of heartbreaks." Bill Bryson

"Why has he been running?" He's been in regular telephone contact with the Swedish prosecutor -- cunning sod.

Have you noticed that all the anger and indignation has been directed at the leakers -- none at those who have been doing wrong.

http://paulonbooks.blogspot.com/
 
 
-12 Rank Up Rank Down
Dec 9, 2010
@bbf: You said:
---
"I know this is a comedy channel, but I suppose we should point out that Assange is no american, and so cannot be a traitor to America."
---
I did not think I had to explain the obvious, but so be it....

Assange is an Australian citizen. Australia is one of the coalition nations that has troops in Afghanistan.

By outing Afghans that were helping us, he insured that no Afghan in his right mind will help us again. Our primary source of intel on where IEDs are being planted was tips from Afghan civilians. No more. IEDs are the biggest cause of severe injury and death to coalition troops, including Australian ones.

Furthermore, Assange released detailed information on the specific methods that our special operations teams use to hunt and capture or kill Taliban leaders. That means most of those methods are now useless, and coalition specops teams will have to 'reinvent the wheel' on coming up with new methods. Team security measures were also revealed. This rather directly endangers spec ops teams hunting in Haji country. Australian special forces teams are deployed to Afghanistan.

So what Assange has done is to, during time of war, illegally reveal highly classified material to the enemy in a way that puts Australian troops and the troops of Australia's military allies in direct danger. He has seriously harmed the war effort and given aid to the enemy. This is the very definition of treason.

Get it now?
------

A message to validate my identity to someone: Hi, Toner! Yes, it is me(3). Or me(06)?
 
 
 
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